School uniforms remain a cultural conundrum

EXCERPT:

Ah, the Japanese schoolgirl, that perennial trendsetter and object of adoration. Few items of clothing evoke such a spectrum of emotions as her attire (be careful when Googling it). Once considered a sartorial example of the East’s rigid conformity, Japan’s schoolgirl uniform has now reached such a globally iconic status that earlier this year the government tried harnessing its powers through “Kawaii Diplomacy.”

For better or worse, it may be working. On Tuesday, the Asahi Shimbun reported that CONOMi, the Niigata-based company making nanchatte seifuku (fake school uniforms) has seen its business booming, not only here in Tokyo but in China, South Korea, Australia and Brazil.

There are dozens of ways to extrapolate why this is, and for each there seems to be a journalist and TV producer poised to explain it to us.

Read the full piece at Japan Pulse.

School uniforms remain a cultural conundrum | Japan Pulse

About Jason Andrew Jenkins

In 1997, Jason left his home near Atlanta for a year abroad. He liked it so much that he never went back. After three years in Taiwan and 13 years in Japan, he and his wife quit their desk jobs in Tokyo, pulled their kids out of local schools and traveled as a family for six years, living in Malaysia, Spain, and Mexico along the way. They returned to Japan — Osaka this time — in the summer of 2019. Jason loves Google Maps, carry-on luggage, and most dishes registering on the Scoville scale.
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